1. Shooting in Black and White

    March 25, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    While at times some might question the purpose of black and white shots when one has a full colour spectrum to utilise, there can be no denying the impact that can be created when shooting in this style. In part this can be attributed to the finer details of a photo that are allowed to shine through. In broader consideration however, removing colour is better means to draw attention to focal points. You can take note of these key aspects to make the most of your black and white photography.     Select your shots carefully Just like certain settings or lighting conditions favour some type of work, it’s important to ensure your work fits in with a black and white style. The biggest attribute of monochromatic photos is the texture and shape they take on from their appearance. This won’t be appropriate in every situation, particularly instances where you… | Read the full article


  2. Natural Lighting vs Artificial Lighting

    March 16, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s an inevitable decision for just about every photographer at some point, particularly portrait photographers – should they use natural lighting, or artificial lighting? Of course, this is often a personal decision and one that photographers would choose for a variety of reasons depending on their circumstances. With that said, what exactly are the differences when shooting with the two different sources of lighting?   Natural lighting that offered by way of the sun and the moon, is a readily available, free and accessible source for photographers to work with. There is no requirement to purchase significant gear or equipment. The exception to this might be diffusers and reflectors, which are designed to distort or enhance natural lighting – these are considerably cheaper than actual sources of lighting like strobes, LEDs and the like. Using natural light is also a great starting point for photographers looking to gauge and comprehend… | Read the full article


  3. Common Mistakes Beginner Photographers Make

    February 19, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    We’ve all been there before when starting a career in photography, making more mistakes than we thought were even possible. Some beginners however, purchase their camera and automatically assume that it will be easy work from there on in. They soon find out though, that the industry isn’t quite as forgiving. What’s more, many of these mistakes repeat themselves such that they become common within the industry. We take a look at the common mistakes beginner photographers make.   Overemphasising the Importance of Gear Beginners often place their blame on the gear they are using. First thing off the bat, new photographers should dismiss this line of thought, as there’s simply little merit associated with it. A photographer’s time is better spent focusing on how they can convey their message through the equipment available to them. Something which is achievable with even the most basic of equipment.   Relying on… | Read the full article


  4. 4 Tips to Help You Grow Your Photography Business

    February 11, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s not always easy for photographers to maintain the momentum behind the growth of their business. On the one hand, while focusing on the technical aspect of one’s career is an obvious necessity, the same emphasis isn’t always paid to the underlying business. Here are four ways to help you grow your photography business.   Manage Your Time Carefully It might seem like the right thing to do by taking on as many clients as you can, but there is another side of the story to consider. When you fill your schedule with shoot after shoot, particularly those that might not align with your particular vision, you are diverting your attention away from your core clients. As such, you may not able to reach as many of them as possible.   Time which you would otherwise spend shooting a non-core client, could instead be used to tighten up or improve… | Read the full article


  5. Taking Risks with Your Photography

    February 4, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    There’s a mantra held by some that in life taking risks results in great rewards. There’s certainly many examples out there to consider, without even including those risks defined as detrimental to one’s health and safety which are NEVER worth attempting. The subtle nuance lies with calculated risks – risks which have been carefully assessed to establish the likely outcome. Rather than taking death-defying risks to land the perfect shot, calculated risks are what can help photographers improve their business.   Allow Yourself to Feel Anxious or Uncomfortable When it comes to complacency, we can sometimes be our own worst enemy. As we’ve detailed previously, a feeling of self-doubt or anxiety allows a photographer to analyse their own work in a new light. This feeling also encapsulates insecurity, which prompts us to ask ourselves – what is our rationale for a particular shoot or project? What does it actually mean… | Read the full article


  6. Avoiding Burnout as a Photographer

    January 30, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    Despite our best intentions, few who have practiced photography all their lives can lay claim to have never felt burnt out. Even those who are involved in ‘lucrative’ careers, or industries that might appear volatile and fast paced can get caught up by that flat feeling or uncertainty about what it is they’re doing with their lives.   While photographers are often thought of as creative, free-thinking people, exposure to other hobbies, businesses and areas of knowledge can open one’s mind to alternative pursuits. And as is human nature, we tend to think the grass is always greener on the other side. However, the reality is that photography can be tremendously exciting, but every now and then it’s wise to follow some general practices to avoid photographer burnout.    Don’t overthink it It’s easy for many photographers to become obsessed with the need to constantly shoot. Known as ‘FOMO’, or… | Read the full article


  7. Submitting Your Wedding Photos for Publishing

    January 26, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    One of the difficulties that wedding photographers face is the challenge of having their work published online or in a magazine publication. With so many photographers vying for the limited space available, it’s easy to see how vital this coverage can be. Not only will it showcase your creativity and talent, but it will serve as some of the most effective marketing available – because it is directly targeted to your core audience.   Noting these benefits, we offer these tips to wedding photographers looking to have their work published. While we anticipate they will improve your chances, at the end of the day the detail and quality of your photos, as well as the story your work is able to convey, will both be defining factors. Make sure all Parties are on the Same Page One of the first things you want to get right is to ensure that… | Read the full article


  8. Alternative Ways to Attract New Photography Clients

    January 8, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    As one might expect, with the benefits associated in having a diverse base of clientele, photographers are often competing to attract new clients. While we are accustom to personal websites and online advertising being the norm within the industry, there are still other ways to attract new leads and convert them into clients. What’s more, none of these particular methods rely upon a ‘hard sell’, yet can be just as effective.   Networking The photography industry is by no means restricted to operating independently. In fact, networking and collaboration is just one vital way that a photographer can grow their book of clients. For instance, wedding photographers could build rapport with makeup artists, who might then be able to advocate for you with another of their own clients.   Similarly, fashion photographers might be well poised to maintain close ties with the designers and/or models they work with, particularly considering… | Read the full article


  9. Telling Clients About Your Other Job

    December 31, 2016 by Rene Anthony

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    One of the articles that caught our attention recently was written by a UK based cinematographer and videographer for Fstoppers, detailing the dilemma that photographers face in deciding whether to tell their clients they have another full-time job. While predominantly angled towards part-time photographers, the reality is, even full-time photographers might find themselves in a position where they work on other tasks or jobs as a part-time commitment. What one needs to consider in addressing the issue, is that photographers often step into the industry and proceed courtesy of a slow and gradual rise. Rarely, if ever, can a photographer command the sort of work volume that would allow them to commit themselves entirely to a career that often relies upon making a name for yourself and word of mouth. There will also be periods where for a more established photographer there is less volume of work, or personal goals… | Read the full article


  10. A Cautionary Tale on Work Released into the Public Domain

    December 18, 2016 by Rene Anthony

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    Earlier this year, the photography industry looked set for one of the most high profile legal cases in recent times. Getty Images found themselves the subject of a $1bn claim, with photographer Carol Highsmith accusing the company of copyright infringement by licensing and selling her publically available work without permission. Furthermore, the media company also demanded the photographer pay to use the photos which she had in fact created. Sounds like a pretty clear-cut case, right? Another example of big companies pushing their weight around? The case was indeed clear-cut – but not as you might see it. You see, in this instance, notwithstanding the fact that Getty had no legal right to claim copyright ownership or exclusive licensing, the company did not infringe on any rights by selling the photographers work. And this is exactly how the courts saw the matter when they sided with Getty. Now, let me… | Read the full article