1. Tips for Low Light Photography

    May 13, 2017 by Rene Anthony

    As any photographer would know, it’s important to be versatile. Not only with one’s style of photography, but for the conditions with which they work. This includes low light conditions, which may be attributable to shooting: outdoors at night, indoors, or where there are varying sources of low–intensity light on offer. What’s more, low light photography skills are necessary for a variety of photographers, including those working with portraits, weddings and landscapes. Of course, a flash would appear a logical solution to deal with low light conditions. However, it’s not necessarily a fix that works in every situation. You see, a flash device, particularly when integrated into a camera, can sometimes result in a flat looking picture by compressing image depth. There are also the complications that come with a flash being distracting to the subject of a photo, as well as the potential need to set up and configure… | Read the full article


  2. Where Photographers Go Wrong in Photoshop

    April 27, 2017 by Rene Anthony

    While the merit of Photoshop has long been debated by photographers, there’s little doubt that the decision is a personal choice. However, what is often overlooked from the conversation is the fact that photographers make mistakes which have the potential to undermine the impact of their work. So what are some of these mistakes? Continue reading to find out.   Overprocessing Let’s talk about the elephant in the room first. Irrespective of whether you advocate for the use of Photoshop to edit your pictures, there is no bigger cardinal sin than overprocessing. One of the biggest areas concerns sharpness, where photographers seek to overcorrect for a very minor, and at times unnoticeable flaw. In turn, this often leads to the photo looking unrealistic. Other watchpoints concern adjustments to contrast, white balance and colours, plus poor bevel and emboss that again make the photo look less authentic.   Not understanding layers… | Read the full article


  3. 4 Things to Avoid When Shooting Portraits

    April 20, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    In just about every photographer’s career they try their hand at portraits. Whether it’s for personal or professional purposes, it’s a form of photography that can complement one’s skillset given its emphasis on lighting, composition and the like. However, despite being commonplace, it’s not unusual to see photographers make the same mistakes. Here are 4 things to avoid when shooting portraits.   Distracting the viewer It might come as a surprise how many photographers try to incorporate too much external detail into their portrait shots. One of the biggest faux pas in this area is a ‘busy’ setting. While there are ways to incorporate a subject into a lively environment and still make them the focal point of the shot, it’s far from easy. Playing it safe and blurring the background via depth of field, or opting for neutral backgrounds is a sure way to maintain the viewer’s attention. Alternatively,… | Read the full article


  4. Presenting Your Portfolio for Review

    April 13, 2017 by Rene Anthony

    Portfolio reviews may be used as a showcase to prospective clients, and as appraisals that offer photographers an invaluable mechanism to receive feedback on their work. They can also form a critical step for photographers who are looking to monetise their work through art or digital enterprises.   One of the first steps a photographer needs to acknowledge however, is whether they are ready to showcase their work for evaluation – be it by peers, partners or clients. After all, it is in our nature to create a lasting impression from our first encounters, so you want to be sure your work is a representation of your true abilities. At the same time, you also need to be prepared to discuss your work and create a strong bond with the other person.   It goes without saying that you should put in the necessary preparation. But what exactly does this… | Read the full article


  5. Why are my Photography Leads not Converting into Clients?

    April 5, 2017 by Rene Anthony

    Despite our best efforts, sometimes we’re left scratching our heads pondering why our leads didn’t convert into clients. While this isn’t an issue restricted to the photography industry, the sheer volume of competition out there exacerbates this problem, particularly for new photographers who are yet to fill their books with clients. With this in mind, we consider three of the common reasons that photography leads don’t convert into clients.   Too Many Options Ever been in a situation where you’re presented with so many options, you have difficulty making a decision? You haven’t? Well, perhaps surprisingly then, it’s worth knowing that too many options can confuse or overwhelm prospective clients. Contrary to what you might think, trying to cater for too many possibilities can be detrimental. This is most evident when clients are relying on you for your expert judgement. Consider simplifying your core offerings and pricing structure based on… | Read the full article


  6. Shooting in Black and White

    March 25, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    While at times some might question the purpose of black and white shots when one has a full colour spectrum to utilise, there can be no denying the impact that can be created when shooting in this style. In part this can be attributed to the finer details of a photo that are allowed to shine through. In broader consideration however, removing colour is better means to draw attention to focal points. You can take note of these key aspects to make the most of your black and white photography.     Select your shots carefully Just like certain settings or lighting conditions favour some type of work, it’s important to ensure your work fits in with a black and white style. The biggest attribute of monochromatic photos is the texture and shape they take on from their appearance. This won’t be appropriate in every situation, particularly instances where you… | Read the full article


  7. Natural Lighting vs Artificial Lighting

    March 16, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s an inevitable decision for just about every photographer at some point, particularly portrait photographers – should they use natural lighting, or artificial lighting? Of course, this is often a personal decision and one that photographers would choose for a variety of reasons depending on their circumstances. With that said, what exactly are the differences when shooting with the two different sources of lighting?   Natural lighting that offered by way of the sun and the moon, is a readily available, free and accessible source for photographers to work with. There is no requirement to purchase significant gear or equipment. The exception to this might be diffusers and reflectors, which are designed to distort or enhance natural lighting – these are considerably cheaper than actual sources of lighting like strobes, LEDs and the like. Using natural light is also a great starting point for photographers looking to gauge and comprehend… | Read the full article


  8. Common Mistakes Beginner Photographers Make

    February 19, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    We’ve all been there before when starting a career in photography, making more mistakes than we thought were even possible. Some beginners however, purchase their camera and automatically assume that it will be easy work from there on in. They soon find out though, that the industry isn’t quite as forgiving. What’s more, many of these mistakes repeat themselves such that they become common within the industry. We take a look at the common mistakes beginner photographers make.   Overemphasising the Importance of Gear Beginners often place their blame on the gear they are using. First thing off the bat, new photographers should dismiss this line of thought, as there’s simply little merit associated with it. A photographer’s time is better spent focusing on how they can convey their message through the equipment available to them. Something which is achievable with even the most basic of equipment.   Relying on… | Read the full article


  9. 4 Tips to Help You Grow Your Photography Business

    February 11, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s not always easy for photographers to maintain the momentum behind the growth of their business. On the one hand, while focusing on the technical aspect of one’s career is an obvious necessity, the same emphasis isn’t always paid to the underlying business. Here are four ways to help you grow your photography business.   Manage Your Time Carefully It might seem like the right thing to do by taking on as many clients as you can, but there is another side of the story to consider. When you fill your schedule with shoot after shoot, particularly those that might not align with your particular vision, you are diverting your attention away from your core clients. As such, you may not able to reach as many of them as possible.   Time which you would otherwise spend shooting a non-core client, could instead be used to tighten up or improve… | Read the full article


  10. Taking Risks with Your Photography

    February 4, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    There’s a mantra held by some that in life taking risks results in great rewards. There’s certainly many examples out there to consider, without even including those risks defined as detrimental to one’s health and safety which are NEVER worth attempting. The subtle nuance lies with calculated risks – risks which have been carefully assessed to establish the likely outcome. Rather than taking death-defying risks to land the perfect shot, calculated risks are what can help photographers improve their business.   Allow Yourself to Feel Anxious or Uncomfortable When it comes to complacency, we can sometimes be our own worst enemy. As we’ve detailed previously, a feeling of self-doubt or anxiety allows a photographer to analyse their own work in a new light. This feeling also encapsulates insecurity, which prompts us to ask ourselves – what is our rationale for a particular shoot or project? What does it actually mean… | Read the full article