1. Shooting in Black and White

    March 25, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    While at times some might question the purpose of black and white shots when one has a full colour spectrum to utilise, there can be no denying the impact that can be created when shooting in this style. In part this can be attributed to the finer details of a photo that are allowed to shine through. In broader consideration however, removing colour is better means to draw attention to focal points. You can take note of these key aspects to make the most of your black and white photography.     Select your shots carefully Just like certain settings or lighting conditions favour some type of work, it’s important to ensure your work fits in with a black and white style. The biggest attribute of monochromatic photos is the texture and shape they take on from their appearance. This won’t be appropriate in every situation, particularly instances where you… | Read the full article


  2. Natural Lighting vs Artificial Lighting

    March 16, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s an inevitable decision for just about every photographer at some point, particularly portrait photographers – should they use natural lighting, or artificial lighting? Of course, this is often a personal decision and one that photographers would choose for a variety of reasons depending on their circumstances. With that said, what exactly are the differences when shooting with the two different sources of lighting?   Natural lighting that offered by way of the sun and the moon, is a readily available, free and accessible source for photographers to work with. There is no requirement to purchase significant gear or equipment. The exception to this might be diffusers and reflectors, which are designed to distort or enhance natural lighting – these are considerably cheaper than actual sources of lighting like strobes, LEDs and the like. Using natural light is also a great starting point for photographers looking to gauge and comprehend… | Read the full article


  3. Balancing Photography with Your Personal Life

    February 26, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    We previously touched on the difficulties some photographers face when their passion for photography becomes a monotonous grind leading to potential burnout. One of the facets we noted concerned not overthinking things, and occupying your mind with other interests, pursuits, hobbies and those around us who we care about. When it comes to managing one’s personal life, how can one strike the right balance with their photography career?   Administrative Block-outs With our constant connection to technology via smartphones, we’re often tempted to feel as though we need to monitor and reply to every email that comes our way as soon as it is received. This might seem like a logical approach, but it’s not necessarily the most efficient – particularly when you are in the middle of something else and trying to manage multiple tasks at the one time. What’s more, it can also creep into your personal life… | Read the full article


  4. Common Mistakes Beginner Photographers Make

    February 19, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    We’ve all been there before when starting a career in photography, making more mistakes than we thought were even possible. Some beginners however, purchase their camera and automatically assume that it will be easy work from there on in. They soon find out though, that the industry isn’t quite as forgiving. What’s more, many of these mistakes repeat themselves such that they become common within the industry. We take a look at the common mistakes beginner photographers make.   Overemphasising the Importance of Gear Beginners often place their blame on the gear they are using. First thing off the bat, new photographers should dismiss this line of thought, as there’s simply little merit associated with it. A photographer’s time is better spent focusing on how they can convey their message through the equipment available to them. Something which is achievable with even the most basic of equipment.   Relying on… | Read the full article


  5. 4 Tips to Help You Grow Your Photography Business

    February 11, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s not always easy for photographers to maintain the momentum behind the growth of their business. On the one hand, while focusing on the technical aspect of one’s career is an obvious necessity, the same emphasis isn’t always paid to the underlying business. Here are four ways to help you grow your photography business.   Manage Your Time Carefully It might seem like the right thing to do by taking on as many clients as you can, but there is another side of the story to consider. When you fill your schedule with shoot after shoot, particularly those that might not align with your particular vision, you are diverting your attention away from your core clients. As such, you may not able to reach as many of them as possible.   Time which you would otherwise spend shooting a non-core client, could instead be used to tighten up or improve… | Read the full article


  6. Taking Risks with Your Photography

    February 4, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    There’s a mantra held by some that in life taking risks results in great rewards. There’s certainly many examples out there to consider, without even including those risks defined as detrimental to one’s health and safety which are NEVER worth attempting. The subtle nuance lies with calculated risks – risks which have been carefully assessed to establish the likely outcome. Rather than taking death-defying risks to land the perfect shot, calculated risks are what can help photographers improve their business.   Allow Yourself to Feel Anxious or Uncomfortable When it comes to complacency, we can sometimes be our own worst enemy. As we’ve detailed previously, a feeling of self-doubt or anxiety allows a photographer to analyse their own work in a new light. This feeling also encapsulates insecurity, which prompts us to ask ourselves – what is our rationale for a particular shoot or project? What does it actually mean… | Read the full article


  7. Submitting Your Wedding Photos for Publishing

    January 26, 2017 by Rene Anthony

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    One of the difficulties that wedding photographers face is the challenge of having their work published online or in a magazine publication. With so many photographers vying for the limited space available, it’s easy to see how vital this coverage can be. Not only will it showcase your creativity and talent, but it will serve as some of the most effective marketing available – because it is directly targeted to your core audience.   Noting these benefits, we offer these tips to wedding photographers looking to have their work published. While we anticipate they will improve your chances, at the end of the day the detail and quality of your photos, as well as the story your work is able to convey, will both be defining factors. Make sure all Parties are on the Same Page One of the first things you want to get right is to ensure that… | Read the full article


  8. Building Rapport With Your Clients For a Photoshoot

    December 11, 2016 by Rene Anthony

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    Regardless of the industry one works in, building rapport with your clients is one of the most important considerations. Not only do you increase the effectiveness of your output, but you also increase the prospects of repeat work from said clients. In turn, you’re also positioning yourself well to generate work from new clients, as word of mouth is one of the most effective forms of marketing for any business. How then can one build rapport with their clients? We discuss a few of the considerations that photographers should be mindful of.   Pay Attention While the opportunity won’t always be available, any instances you do have to meet your client informally for a quick chat will do wonders to let them know that you’re accessible. This opportunity is also valuable to ask questions and understand the specific requirements of each client. After all, because every project is different, you… | Read the full article


  9. Why There is Merit in Working with Others

    November 25, 2016 by Rene Anthony

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    It’s easy to think of photography as an individual industry. After all, you’re likely operating as a sole trader business, while also ‘competing’ for work against others you may never even meet. But behind this façade it’s important to learn that becoming a better photographer is often leveraged through the relationships you form while working with those around you.   On the one hand, you might be tempted to view other photographers as competitors. And in some instances, you’re right. However, if you’re looking to attract and sustain the right type of customer – that is, a loyal one – then you’ll learn that these clients often make their decision based on unique facets specific to a photographer. For example, their creative flair or personality.   In this sense because imitation isn’t necessarily desirable as a photographer when you’re trying to build your own brand, and you don’t want to… | Read the full article


  10. What Emphasis Should New Photographers Place on Their Photography Equipment

    September 30, 2016 by Rene Anthony

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    We often hear from a lot of new or emerging photographers about some of the barriers they face in turning their passion into a sustainable livelihood. At times, this might be because their prospective client is looking for someone with a broader portfolio of work. In other instances, word of mouth marketing or the sheer level of competition might go against the photographer. And then there is the other argument – that they don’t have the best photography equipment to compete against the best.   While the first few of these arguments might hold some merit, the fact of the matter is, the last argument doesn’t keep its head above water. For starters, every other photographer before you, and who has since gone on to make a living out of the profession would have likely contended with equipment that was (technically) limited when they started – compared with their established… | Read the full article